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cutback

[ kuht-bak ]
/ ˈkʌtˌbæk /
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noun
a reduction in rate, quantity, etc.: a cutback in production.
a return in the course of a story, motion picture, etc., to earlier events.
Football. a play in which the ball-carrier abruptly reverses direction, especially by starting to make an end run and then turning suddenly to run toward the middle of the line.
a maneuver in surfing of heading the surfboard back toward a wave's crest.
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Origin of cutback

First recorded in 1895–1900; noun use of verb phrase cut back
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use cutback in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for cutback

cutback
/ (ˈkʌtˌbæk) /

noun
a decrease or reduction
another word (esp US) for flashback
verb cut back (adverb)
(tr) to shorten by cutting off the end; prune
(when intr, foll by on) to reduce or make a reduction (in)
(intr) mainly US (in films) to show an event that took place earlier in the narrative; flash back
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Other Idioms and Phrases with cutback

cut back

1

Shorten by cutting, prune, as in It's time we cut back these bushes. [1860s]

2

Reduce, decrease, as in They are going to cut back defense spending, or We have to cut back production. [c. 1940] Also see cut to the bone.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.
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