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decided

[dih-sahy-did]
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adjective
  1. in no way uncertain or ambiguous; unquestionable; unmistakable: a decided victory.
  2. free from hesitation or wavering; resolute; determined: a decided approach to a problem.
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Origin of decided

First recorded in 1780–90; decide + -ed2
Related formsde·cid·ed·ly, adverbde·cid·ed·ness, nounpre·de·cid·ed, adjectivewell-de·cid·ed, adjective

Synonyms

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1. undeniable, indisputable, positive, certain, pronounced, definite, sure, indubitable. 2. resolved, unhesitating, unwavering.

Antonyms

1, 2. uncertain.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for decidedly

Contemporary Examples

Historical Examples

  • Decidedly, Dick had been a godsend, and his absence would be a calamity.

    Viviette

    William J. Locke

  • "But I do," said he so decidedly, that the girl looked at him surprised.

    Rico and Wiseli

    Johanna Spyri

  • But if few in number, the gathering was decidedly formidable in appearance.

  • Decidedly, the time had come when definite action should not be delayed.

    Dust

    Mr. and Mrs. Haldeman-Julius

  • This wood is stated to be decidedly superior to the last named.


British Dictionary definitions for decidedly

decided

adjective (prenominal)
  1. unmistakablea decided improvement
  2. determined; resolutea girl of decided character
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Derived Formsdecidedly, adverbdecidedness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for decidedly

decided

adj.

"resolute," 1790, past participle adjective from decide. A decided victory is one whose reality is not in doubt; a decisive one goes far toward settling some issue. Related: Decidedly.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper