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deform

1
[ dih-fawrm ]
/ dɪˈfɔrm /
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See synonyms for: deform / deformed on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to mar the natural form or shape of; put out of shape; disfigure: In cases where the drug was taken during pregnancy, its effects deformed the infants.
to make ugly, ungraceful, or displeasing; mar the beauty of; spoil: The trees had been completely deformed by the force of the wind.
to change the form of; transform.
Geology, Mechanics. to subject to deformation: The metal was deformed under stress.
verb (used without object)
to undergo deformation.
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Origin of deform

1
1350–1400; Middle English deformen, from Latin dēfōrmāre, equivalent to dē-de- + fōrmāre “to shape, form” (see form)

synonym study for deform

1. See mar.

OTHER WORDS FROM deform

Other definitions for deform (2 of 2)

deform2
[ dih-fawrm ]
/ dɪˈfɔrm /

adjective Archaic.
deformed; ugly.

Origin of deform

2
1350–1400; Middle English defo(u)rme<Latin dēformis, equivalent to dē-de- + -formis-form
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use deform in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for deform

deform
/ (dɪˈfɔːm) /

verb
to make or become misshapen or distorted
(tr) to mar the beauty of; disfigure
(tr) to subject or be subjected to a stress that causes a change of dimensions

Derived forms of deform

deformable, adjectivedeformability, noundeformer, noun

Word Origin for deform

C15: from Latin dēformāre, from de- + forma shape, beauty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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