demit

1
[ dih-mit ]
/ dɪˈmɪt /

verb (used with object), de·mit·ted, de·mit·ting.

to resign (a job, public office, etc.); relinquish.
Archaic. to dismiss; fire.

verb (used without object), de·mit·ted, de·mit·ting.

to resign.

noun

Also dimit. (especially in Freemasonry) a written certification of honorable withdrawal or resignation, as from membership.

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seclusion

Origin of demit

1
1520–30; <Middle French demettre,Old French demetre<Latin dēmittere to demit2 (but also with some senses of Latin dīmittere send away, dismiss, equivalent to dī-di-2 + mittere to send)

Definition for demit (2 of 2)

demit2
[ dih-mit ]
/ dɪˈmɪt /

verb (used with object), de·mit·ted, de·mit·ting.

to put in or send to a lower place.
Obsolete. to lower in status, rank, or esteem; humble.

Origin of demit

2
1550–60; <Latin dēmittere to let fall, send down, equivalent to dē-de- + mittere to send
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

Example sentences from the Web for demit

  • Whereupon he demitted his charge, and came to dwell with his son at Liberton.

  • Malignants being again brought into places of power and trust, he demitted his office.

  • It makes fresh use of its demitted envelope, and turns it into a bark.

    The Insect|Jules Michelet

British Dictionary definitions for demit

demit
/ (dɪˈmɪt) /

verb -mits, -mitting or -mitted Scot

to resign (an office, position, etc)
(tr) to dismiss

Word Origin for demit

C16: from Latin dīmittere to send forth, discharge, renounce, from di- ² + mittere to send
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012