detract

[ dih-trakt ]
/ dɪˈtrækt /

verb (used without object)

to take away a part, as from quality, value, or reputation (usually followed by from).

verb (used with object)

to draw away or divert; distract: to detract another's attention from more important issues.
Archaic. to take away (a part); abate: The dilapidated barn detracts charm from the landscape.

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Origin of detract

1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French detracter) < Latin dētractus drawn away (past participle of dētrahere), equivalent to dē- de- + tractus drawn; see tract1

OTHER WORDS FROM detract

de·tract·ing·ly, adverbde·trac·tor, nounun·de·tract·ing, adjectiveun·de·tract·ing·ly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for detracted

British Dictionary definitions for detracted

detract
/ (dɪˈtrækt) /

verb

(when intr, usually foll by from) to take away a part (of); diminishher anger detracts from her beauty
(tr) to distract or divert
(tr) obsolete to belittle or disparage

Derived forms of detract

detractingly, adverbdetractive or detractory, adjectivedetractively, adverbdetractor, noun

Word Origin for detract

C15: from Latin dētractus drawn away, from dētrahere to pull away, disparage, from de- + trahere to drag

usage for detract

Detract is sometimes wrongly used where distract is meant: a noise distracted (not detracted) my attention
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012