ding

1
[ding]
See more synonyms for ding on Thesaurus.com
verb (used without object)
  1. to make a ringing sound.
  2. to talk insistently.
noun
  1. a ringing sound.

Origin of ding

1
First recorded in 1575–85; see origin at ding-dong

ding

2
[ding]Informal.
verb (used with object)
  1. to cause surface damage to; dent: Flying gravel had dinged the car's fenders.
  2. to strike with force; hit: The catcher was dinged on the shoulder by a wild throw.
  3. to blackball: Only one freshman was dinged by the fraternity.
noun
  1. dent; nick: The surfboard has a few dings in it from scraping over rocks.

Origin of ding

2
1250–1300; Middle English dingen, dengen, probably Old English *dingan; akin to Old English dencgan, Old Norse dengja

Darling

[dahr-ling]
noun
  1. Jay Nor·wood [nawr-woo d] /ˈnɔr wʊd/, Ding, 1876–1962, U.S. political cartoonist.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for ding

knock, pound, beat, drive, clang, dent, dash, nick, stroke, thump, thrust, ring

Examples from the Web for ding

Contemporary Examples of ding

Historical Examples of ding

  • Gol ding yeh, I'll shove this knife in behind your ear if you don't tell!

    The Flaming Jewel

    Robert W. Chambers

  • She must get through the day without him, ding, dong, she must get through all the years!

    Mistress Anne

    Temple Bailey

  • Ding it all to gosh, here it is after one o'clock an' you still talkin'.

    Anderson Crow, Detective

    George Barr McCutcheon

  • The word of command for all hands to begin their work is ‘Ding!’

    A Floating Home

    Cyril Ionides

  • When fishermen throw their catch down into the hold, they are said to ding it.

    A Floating Home

    Cyril Ionides


British Dictionary definitions for ding

ding

1
verb
  1. to ring or cause to ring, esp with tedious repetition
  2. (tr) another word for din 1 (def. 2)
noun
  1. an imitation or representation of the sound of a bell
  2. Australian informal a party or social event

Word Origin for ding

C13: probably of imitative origin, but influenced by din 1 + ring ²; compare Old Swedish diunga to beat

ding

2
verb Scot
  1. to strike; dash down
  2. to surpass

Word Origin for ding

Middle English dingen

darling

noun
  1. a person very much loved: often used as a term of address
  2. a favouritethe teacher's darling
adjective (prenominal)
  1. beloved
  2. much admired; pleasinga darling hat

Word Origin for darling

Old English dēorling; see dear, -ling 1

Darling

noun
  1. Grace. 1815–42, English national heroine, famous for her rescue (1838) of some shipwrecked sailors with her father, a lighthouse keeper
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for ding
v.

1819, "to sound as metal when struck," possibly abstracted from ding-dong, of imitative origin. The meaning "to deal heavy blows" is c.1300, probably from Old Norse dengja "to hammer," perhaps also imitative. Meaning "dent" is 1960s. Related: Dinged; dinging.

darling

Old English deorling "darling, favorite minion," double diminutive of deor "dear" (see dear (adj.)). The vowel shift from -e- to -a- (16c.) is usual for -er- followed by a consonant. "It is better to be An olde mans derlyng, than a yong mans werlyng" (1562).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper