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district

[ dis-trikt ]
/ ˈdɪs trɪkt /
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See synonyms for: district / districts on Thesaurus.com

noun
a division of territory, as of a country, state, or county, marked off for administrative, electoral, or other purposes.
a region or locality: the theater district; the Lake District.
British. a subdivision of a county or a town.
the District, the District of Columbia; Washington, D.C.
verb (used with object)
to divide into districts.
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Origin of district

First recorded in 1605–15; from French, from Medieval Latin distrīctus “exercise of justice, restraining of offenders,” derivative of Latin distringere “to stretch out; detain, occupy,” equivalent to di- suffix of separation + strig- (base of stringere “to bind, tie”) + -tus suffix of verbal action; see distrain, di-2

OTHER WORDS FROM district

in·ter·dis·trict, adjectiveoutdistrict, nounpre·dis·trict, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use district in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for district

district
/ (ˈdɪstrɪkt) /

noun
verb
(tr) to divide into districts

Word Origin for district

C17: from Medieval Latin districtus area of jurisdiction, from Latin distringere to stretch out; see distrain
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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