divert

[ dih-vurt, dahy- ]
/ dɪˈvɜrt, daɪ- /
||

verb (used with object)

to turn aside or from a path or course; deflect.
British. to route (traffic) on a detour.
to draw off to a different course, purpose, etc.
to distract from serious occupation; entertain or amuse.

verb (used without object)

to turn aside; veer: It is sad to see so much talent divert to trivial occupations.

Origin of divert

1400–50; late Middle English < Latin dīvertere, equivalent to dī- di-2 + vertere to turn

SYNONYMS FOR divert

ANTONYMS FOR divert

4 bore.

Related forms

Synonym study

4. See amuse.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for diverter

  • Diversion of water from an irrigation ditch in which the diverter has no interest is not a very serious offense.

    Ifugao Law|R. F. Burton
  • Edna Hill developed new resources as an encourager, a diverter, and an unfailing optimist in regard to the outcome.

    The Mystery of Murray Davenport|Robert Neilson Stephens

British Dictionary definitions for diverter

divert

/ (daɪˈvɜːt) /

verb

to turn (a person or thing) aside from a course; deflect
(tr) to entertain; amuse
(tr) to distract the attention of

Derived Forms

Word Origin for divert

C15: from French divertir, from Latin dīvertere to turn aside, from di- ² + vertere to turn
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012