doggy

1

or dog·gie

[daw-gee, dog-ee]

Origin of doggy

1
First recorded in 1815–25; dog + -y2

doggy

2

or dog·gie

[daw-gee, dog-ee]
adjective, dog·gi·er, dog·gi·est.
  1. of or relating to a dog: a doggy smell.
  2. fond of dogs: tweedy, doggy people.
  3. pretentious; ostentatious.

Origin of doggy

2
Middle English word dating back to 1350–1400; see origin at dog, -y1
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for doggie

Contemporary Examples of doggie

  • “We can live without it, we may live longer without it, and the doggie bag will survive just fine,” the mayor plans to say.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Bloomberg Crosses the Thin Foam Line

    Ilana Glazer

    February 14, 2013

  • The same tendency to anthropomorphize helps sell everything from doggie sweaters to… catered birthday bashes.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Man's Only Friend

    Michael Schaffer

    March 31, 2009

Historical Examples of doggie

  • You tell him I'll stand him on his off ear if I catch him doggie' me ag'in.

    Good Indian

    B. M. Bower

  • He jumped, and barked, and said "I forgive you" in every doggie way that he knew.

    The Goody-Naughty Book

    Sarah Cory Rippey

  • "When you come nex' time, I hope you'll bring that doggie," said Fly.

  • People to this day call him Doggie, without any notion of the origin of the name.

    The Rough Road

    William John Locke

  • And dont worry about changing, as Doggie began to murmur excuses, I cant.

    The Rough Road

    William John Locke


British Dictionary definitions for doggie

doggy

doggie

noun plural -gies
  1. a children's word for a dog
adjective
  1. of, like, or relating to a dog
  2. fond of dogs
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for doggie

doggy

n.

also doggie, 1825, from dog (n.) + -y (3). Doggy-bag attested from 1965. As an adj. doggy is attested from late 14c., from -y (2). The word has been used in various formations since at least late 19c. to describe the sex act when one partner is on all fours.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper