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Edinburgh

[ ed-n-bur-uh, -buhr-uh or, especially British, -bruh ]
/ ˈɛd nˌbɜr ə, -ˌbʌr ə or, especially British, -brə /
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noun

Duke of. Philip (def. 4).
a city in and the capital of Scotland, in the SE part: administrative center of the Lothian region.

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

British Dictionary definitions for Edinburgh (1 of 2)

Edinburgh1
/ (ˈɛdɪnbərə, -brə) /

noun

the capital of Scotland and seat of the Scottish Parliament (from 1999), in City of Edinburgh council area on the S side of the Firth of Forth: became the capital in the 15th century; castle; three universities (including University of Edinburgh, 1583); commercial and cultural centre, noted for its annual festival. Pop: 430 082 (2001)
City of a council area in central Scotland, created from part of Lothian region in 1996. Pop: 448 370 (2003 est). Area: 262 sq km (101 sq miles)

British Dictionary definitions for Edinburgh (2 of 2)

Edinburgh2
/ (ˈɛdɪnbərə, -brə) /

noun

Duke of, title of Prince Philip Mountbatten. born 1921, husband of Elizabeth II of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Cultural definitions for Edinburgh

Edinburgh
[ (ed-n-buh-ruh) ]

Capital of Scotland, located in the Lothian region in the southeastern part; Scotland's banking and administrative center.

The University of Edinburgh, which was founded in the sixteenth century, is noted for its faculties of divinity, law, medicine, music, and the arts.
As a cultural center, Edinburgh was especially prominent in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, when the philosophers David Hume and Adam Smith, the authors Robert Burns and Sir Walter Scott, and the scientist James Hutton were active.
The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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