Edwardian

[ed-wawr-dee-uh n, -wahr-]
adjective
  1. of or relating to the reign of Edward VII.
  2. reflecting the opulence or self-satisfaction characteristic of this reign.
  3. noting or pertaining to the castle architecture of Edward I.
noun
  1. a person who lived during the reign of Edward VII.

Origin of Edwardian

1860–65; Edward (VII, I) + -ian
Related formsEd·ward·i·an·ism, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for edwardian

Contemporary Examples of edwardian

Historical Examples of edwardian

  • The Edwardian castles of Caernarvon and Beaumaris belong to this type of fortress.

    English Villages

    P. H. Ditchfield

  • You mean—go back to the Edwardian youthfulness she had abandoned?

    December Love

    Robert Hichens

  • And now, in her secret vexation, she was moved to speak of the once famous Edwardian.

    December Love

    Robert Hichens

  • The compliment was the greater because the Edwardian had not encouraged him.

    December Love

    Robert Hichens

  • A third minor variety of the Edwardian stamps must be recorded.

    Peeps at Postage Stamps

    Stanley Currie Johnson


British Dictionary definitions for edwardian

Edwardian

adjective
  1. denoting, relating to, or having the style of life, architecture, dress, etc, current in Britain during the reign of Edward VII
noun
  1. a person who lived during the reign of Edward VII
Derived FormsEdwardianism, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for edwardian

Edwardian

adj.

1861, in reference to the medieval English kings of that name; 1908 in the sense of "of the time or reign of Edward VII" (1901-10), and, since 1934, especially with reference to the men's clothing styles (cf. teddy-boy, 1954, for which see Teddy). From Edward + -ian.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper