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energize

[en-er-jahyz]
verb (used with object), en·er·gized, en·er·giz·ing.
  1. to give energy to; rouse into activity: to energize the spirit with brave words.
  2. to supply electrical current to or store electrical energy in.
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verb (used without object), en·er·gized, en·er·giz·ing.
  1. to be in operation; put forth energy.
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Also especially British, en·er·gise.

Origin of energize

First recorded in 1745–55; energ(y) + -ize
Related formsre·en·er·gize, verb (used with object), re·en·er·gized, re·en·er·giz·ing.su·per·en·er·gized, adjectiveun·en·er·gized, adjective
Can be confusedenergize enervate innervate invigorate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for energised

Historical Examples

  • Love is not glorious unless it be braced and energised by power.

    Expositions of Holy Scripture

    Alexander Maclaren

  • This energised rotating spherical mass is thus the primal conception of the energy scheme now to be outlined.

  • It is clear that the material at different parts of the rotating spheroid will be energised to varying degrees.

  • If the system were energised to the requisite degree, every energy operation could be carried out as before.

  • But yet, in point of fact, what was it that inspired and energised the earlier processes, if not this same Divine Influx?


British Dictionary definitions for energised

energize

energise

verb
  1. to have or cause to have energy; invigorate
  2. (tr) to apply a source of electric current or electromotive force to (a circuit, field winding, etc)
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Derived Formsenergizer or energiser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for energised

energize

v.

1751; see energy + -ize. Related: Energized; energizing.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper