ensemble

[ ahn-sahm-buhl, -sahmb; French ahn-sahn-bluh ]
/ ɑnˈsɑm bəl, -ˈsɑmb; French ɑ̃ˈsɑ̃ blə /

noun, plural en·sem·bles [ahn-sahm-sahm-buhlz, -sahmbz; French ahn-sahn-bluh]. /ɑnˈsɑmˈsɑm bəlz, -ˈsɑmbz; French ɑ̃ˈsɑ̃ blə/.

all the parts of a thing taken together, so that each part is considered only in relation to the whole.
the entire costume of an individual, especially when all the parts are in harmony: She was wearing a beautiful ensemble by one of the French designers.
a set of furniture.
Music.
  1. the united performance of an entire group of singers, musicians, etc.
  2. the group so performing: a string ensemble.
a group of supporting entertainers, as actors, dancers, and singers, in a theatrical production.

QUIZZES

GEE WHILLIKERS! WAIT TILL YOU SEE THIS WORD OF THE DAY QUIZ!

Do you remember all the words from last week, September 21–27, 2020? Then this quiz should be butyraceous.
Question 1 of 7
What does “yare” mean?

Origin of ensemble

1740–50; <French: together <Latin insimul, equivalent to in-in-2 + simul together; see simultaneous
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for ensemble

British Dictionary definitions for ensemble

ensemble
/ (ɒnˈsɒmbəl, French ɑ̃sɑ̃blə) /

noun

adverb

all together or at once

adjective

(of a film or play) involving several separate but often interrelated story linesensemble comedy drama
involving no individual star but several actors whose roles are of equal importancefine ensemble playing

Word Origin for ensemble

C15: from French: together, from Latin insimul, from in- ² + simul at the same time
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012