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errata

[ ih-rah-tuh, ih-rey-, ih-rat-uh ]
/ ɪˈrɑ tə, ɪˈreɪ-, ɪˈræt ə /
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noun
plural of erratum.
a list of errors and their corrections inserted, usually on a separate page or slip of paper, in a book or other publication; corrigenda.
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Origin of errata

First recorded in 1625–35

usage note for errata

Errata is originally the plural of the singular Latin noun erratum. Like many such borrowed nouns ( agenda; candelabra ), it came by the mid-17th century to be used as a singular noun, meaning “a list of errors or corrections to be made (in a book).” Despite objections by some to this singular use, it is common in standard English: The errata begins on page 237. When errata clearly means “errors,” it takes plural verbs and pronouns: Although errata were frequent in the first printing, most of them were corrected in subsequent printings. As a singular noun, errata has developed an English plural form erratas, which is rarely used.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

British Dictionary definitions for errata

errata
/ (ɪˈrɑːtə) /

noun
the plural of erratum
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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