ester

[es-ter]
noun Chemistry.
  1. a compound produced by the reaction between an acid and an alcohol with the elimination of a molecule of water, as ethyl acetate, C4H8O2, or dimethyl sulfate, C2H6SO4.

Origin of ester

First recorded in 1850–55; coined by L. Gmelin (1788–1853), German chemist
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for esters

Contemporary Examples of esters

  • I was trying to find information about a long-dead character who hailed from Esters' part of the state.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Oprah's Cousin Bashes Book

    Alex Heard

    April 22, 2010

  • "She did refuse to have me on the show," Esters told me in her distinctly non-whiney way.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Oprah's Cousin Bashes Book

    Alex Heard

    April 22, 2010

  • On the phone, Esters assured me that Kelley's statements about their meetings are a big, honking fabrication.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Oprah's Cousin Bashes Book

    Alex Heard

    April 22, 2010

  • Kelley mentioned one other: That Esters has been stomped into submission by an 800-pound Harpo.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Oprah's Cousin Bashes Book

    Alex Heard

    April 22, 2010

  • I'm sure that great pressure has been brought to bear on Mrs. Esters.

    The Daily Beast logo
    Oprah's Cousin Bashes Book

    Alex Heard

    April 22, 2010

Historical Examples of esters


British Dictionary definitions for esters

ester

noun
  1. chem any of a class of compounds produced by reaction between acids and alcohols with the elimination of water. Esters with low molecular weights, such as ethyl acetate, are usually volatile fragrant liquids; fats are solid esters

Word Origin for ester

C19: from German, probably a contraction of Essigäther acetic ether, from Essig vinegar (ultimately from Latin acētum) + Äther ether
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for esters

ester

n.

compound formed by an acid joined to an alcohol, 1852, coined in German in 1848 by German chemist Leoipold Gmelin (1788-1853), professor at Heidelberg. "[A]pparently a pure invention" [Flood], perhaps a contraction of or abstraction from Essigäther, the German name for ethyl acetate, from Essig "vinegar" + Äther "ether" (see ether).

Essig is from Old High German ezzih, from a metathesis of Latin acetum (see vinegar).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

esters in Medicine

ester

[ĕstər]
n.
  1. Any of a class of organic compounds corresponding to the inorganic salts and formed from an organic acid and an alcohol, usually with the elimination of water.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

esters in Science

ester

[ĕstər]
  1. An organic compound formed when an acid and an alcohol combine and release water. Esters formed from carboxylic acids are the most common, and have the general formula RCOOR, where R and R are organic radicals. Esters formed from simple hydrocarbon groups are colorless, volatile liquids with pleasant aromas and create the fragrances and flavors of many flowers and fruits. They are also used as food flavorings. Larger esters, formed from long-chain carboxylic acids, commonly occur as animal and vegetable fats, oils, and waxes. Esters have a wide range of uses in industry.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.