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expropriate

[ eks-proh-pree-eyt ]
/ 蓻ks藞pro蕣 pri藢e瑟t /
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See synonyms for: expropriate / expropriation on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object), ex路pro路pri路at路ed, ex路pro路pri路at路ing.
to take possession of, especially for public use by the right of eminent domain, thus divesting the title of the private owner: The government expropriated the land for a recreation area.
to dispossess (a person) of ownership: The revolutionary government expropriated the landowners from their estates.
to take (something) from another's possession for one's own use: He expropriated my ideas for his own article.
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Origin of expropriate

1605鈥15; from Medieval Latin expropri膩tus 鈥渟eparated from one's own鈥 (past participle of expropri膩re ), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + propri(膩re) 鈥渢o appropriate鈥 (derivative of proprius proper) + -膩tus -ate1

OTHER WORDS FROM expropriate

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH expropriate

appropriate, expropriate
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 漏 Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use expropriate in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for expropriate

expropriate
/ (蓻ks藞pr蓹蕣pr瑟藢e瑟t) /

verb (tr)
to deprive (an owner) of (property), esp by taking it for public useSee also eminent domain

Derived forms of expropriate

expropriable, adjectiveexpropriation, nounexpropriator, noun

Word Origin for expropriate

C17: from Medieval Latin expropri膩re to deprive of possessions, from proprius own
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition 漏 William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 漏 HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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