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Origin of fatigue

1685–95; <French fatigue (noun), fatiguer (v.) <Latin fatīgāre to tire

OTHER WORDS FROM fatigue

fa·tigue·less, adjectivefa·ti·guing·ly, adverban·ti·fa·tigue, adjectiveun·fa·ti·guing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use fatigue in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for fatigue

fatigue
/ (fəˈtiːɡ) /

noun
verb -tigues, -tiguing or -tigued
to make or become weary or exhausted
to crack or break (a material or part) by inducing fluctuating stresses in it, or (of a metal or part) to become weakened or fail as a result of fluctuating stresses

Derived forms of fatigue

fatigable (ˈfætɪɡəbəl), adjectivefatigueless, adjective

Word Origin for fatigue

C17: from French, from fatiguer to tire, from Latin fatīgāre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for fatigue

fatigue
[ fə-tēg ]

n.
Physical or mental weariness resulting from exertion.
A sensation of boredom and lassitude due to absence of stimulation, to monotony, or to lack of interest in one's surroundings.
The decreased capacity or complete inability of an organism, organ, or part to function normally because of excessive stimulation or prolonged exertion.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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