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fidget

[ fij-it ]
/ ˈfɪdʒ ɪt /
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See synonyms for: fidget / fidgeting on Thesaurus.com

verb (used without object)
to move about restlessly, nervously, or impatiently.
to play with something in a restless or nervous way; fiddle: The boy kept fidgeting with the toy instead of paying attention.
verb (used with object)
to cause to fidget; make uneasy: He was fidgeted by a hunch that the girl was going to cause trouble.
noun
Often fidg·ets. the condition or an instance of being nervously restless, uneasy, or impatient.
Also fidg·et·er. a person who fidgets.
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Origin of fidget

First recorded in 1665–75; compare dialectal fidge “to fidget,” akin to the synonymous expressive words fitch, fig, fike; compare Old Norse fīkjast “to be eager,” Old Swedish fīkja “to be restless”

OTHER WORDS FROM fidget

fidg·et·ing·ly, adverbun·fidg·et·ing, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use fidget in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for fidget

fidget
/ (ˈfɪdʒɪt) /

verb
(intr) to move about restlessly
(intr often foll by with) to make restless or uneasy movements (with something); fiddlehe fidgeted with his pen
(tr) to cause to fidget
(tr) to cause to worry; make uneasy
noun
(often plural) a state of restlessness or unease, esp as expressed in continual motionhe's got the fidgets
a person who fidgets

Derived forms of fidget

fidgetingly, adverbfidgety, adjective

Word Origin for fidget

C17: from earlier fidge, probably from Old Norse fīkjast to desire eagerly
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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