Idioms

    cut a figure. cut(defs 84, 85b).

Origin of figure

1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin figūra shape, trope, equivalent to fig- (base of fingere to shape) + -ūra -ure
Related formsfig·ur·a·ble, adjectivefig·ure·less, adjectivefig·ur·er, nounout·fig·ure, verb (used with object), out·fig·ured, out·fig·ur·ing.re·fig·ure, verb (used with object), re·fig·ured, re·fig·ur·ing.sub·fig·ure, nounun·fig·ur·a·ble, adjective

Synonyms for figure

1. number. 2. sum, total; price. 5. See form. 8. personality. 23. reckon.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


Examples from the Web for figure

Contemporary Examples of figure

Historical Examples of figure

  • Coming on deck, he saw a figure which seemed familiar to him.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • Robert glanced at Halbert's figure, slight compared with his own, and laughed.

    Brave and Bold

    Horatio Alger

  • A figure in white, with a stiff white cap, stood by the bed.

  • Gives her opinion of the force which figure or person may be allowed to have upon her sex.

    Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9)

    Samuel Richardson

  • You can peel the stuff out of your pockets with one hand, I figure.


British Dictionary definitions for figure

figure

noun

any written symbol other than a letter, esp a whole number
another name for digit (def. 2)
an amount expressed numericallya figure of 1800 was suggested
(plural) calculations with numbershe's good at figures
visible shape or form; outline
the human form, esp as regards size or shapea girl with a slender figure
a slim bodily shape (esp in the phrases keep or lose one's figure)
a character or personage, esp a prominent or notable one; personalitya figure in politics
the impression created by a person through behaviour (esp in the phrase to cut a fine, bold, etc, figure)
  1. a person as impressed on the mindthe figure of Napoleon
  2. (in combination)father-figure
a representation in painting or sculpture, esp of the human form
an illustration or explanatory diagram in a text
a representative object or symbol; emblem
a pattern or design, as on fabric or in wood
a predetermined set of movements in dancing or skating
geometry any combination of points, lines, curves, or planes. A plane figure, such as a circle, encloses an area; a solid figure such as a sphere, encloses a volume
rhetoric See figure of speech
logic one of the four possible arrangements of the three terms in the premises of a syllogismCompare mood 2 (def. 2)
music
  1. a numeral written above or below a note in a partSee figured bass, thorough bass
  2. a characteristic short pattern of notes

verb

(when tr, often foll by up) to calculate or compute (sums, amounts, etc)
(tr; usually takes a clause as object) informal, mainly US, Canadian and NZ to think or conclude; consider
(tr) to represent by a diagram or illustration
(tr) to pattern or mark with a design
(tr) to depict or portray in a painting, etc
(tr) rhetoric to express by means of a figure of speech
(tr) to imagine
(tr) music
  1. to decorate (a melody line or part) with ornamentation
  2. to provide figures above or below (a bass part) as an indication of the accompanying harmonies requiredSee figured bass, thorough bass
(intr usually foll by in) to be includedhis name figures in the article
(intr) informal to accord with expectation; be logicalit figures that he wouldn't come
go figure informal an expression of surprise, astonishment, wonder, etc
Derived Formsfigureless, adjectivefigurer, noun

Word Origin for figure

C13: from Latin figūra a shape, from fingere to mould
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for figure
n.

early 13c., "visible form or appearance of a person," from Old French figure (10c.) "shape, body, form, figure; symbol, allegory," from Latin figura "a shape, form, figure," from PIE *dheigh- "to form, build" (see dough); originally in English with meaning "numeral," but sense of "form, likeness" is almost as old (mid-13c.).

Philosophical and scientific senses are from Latin figura being used to translate Greek skhema. The rhetorical use of figure dates to late 14c.; hence figure of speech (1824). Figure eight as a shape was originally figure of eight (c.1600).

v.

late 14c., "to represent" (in a picture); see figure (n.). Meaning "to shape into" is early 15c.; "to picture in the mind" is from c.1600; "to make an appearance" is c.1600. Meaning "work out a sum" is from 1833, American English. Related: Figured; figuring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

figure in Medicine

figure

[fĭgyər]

n.

A form or shape, as of the human body.
A person representing the essential aspects of a particular role.
The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Idioms and Phrases with figure

figure

In addition to the idioms beginning with figure

  • figure in
  • figure on
  • figure out
  • figure up

also see:

  • ballpark figure
  • in round numbers (figures)
  • it figures
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.