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flammable

[ flam-uh-buhl ]
/ ˈflæm ə bəl /
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adjective

easily set on fire; combustible; inflammable.

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Origin of flammable

First recorded in 1805–15; from Latin flammā(re) “to set on fire” + -ble

words often confused with flammable

OTHER WORDS FROM flammable

flam·ma·bil·i·ty [flam-uh-bil-i-tee], /ˌflæm əˈbɪl ɪ ti/, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

How to use flammable in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for flammable

flammable
/ (ˈflæməbəl) /

adjective

liable to catch fire; readily combustible; inflammable

Derived forms of flammable

flammability, noun

usage for flammable

Flammable and inflammable are interchangeable when used of the properties of materials. Flammable is, however, often preferred for warning labels as there is less likelihood of misunderstanding (inflammable being sometimes taken to mean not flammable). Inflammable is preferred in figurative contexts: this could prove to be an inflammable situation
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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