flub

[ fluhb ]
/ flʌb /

verb (used with or without object), flubbed, flub·bing.

to perform poorly; blunder; bungle: He flubbed the last shot and lost the match.

noun

a blunder.

Origin of flub

An Americanism dating back to 1920–25; origin uncertain
Related formsflub·ber, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for flub

  • The DHS secretary will likely survive her "the system worked" flub.

    Heckuvajob, Napolitano|Reihan Salam|December 29, 2009|DAILY BEAST
  • And all confessed and joined his party, and he was known as the wisest king of the Flub Dubs.

    'Charge It'|Irving Bacheller
  • "I seem to flub everything," I remarked, unaccountably nettled.

    I Walked in Arden|Jack Crawford
  • When a half-grown girl, a half-baked boy, a flub like Mulready—damn his eyes!

    The Black Bag|Louis Joseph Vance

British Dictionary definitions for flub

flub

/ (flʌb) informal /

noun

an embarrassing mistake or blunder

verb flubs, flubbing or flubbed

(intr) to blunder or make an embarrassing mistake

Word Origin for flub

C20: of origin unknown
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for flub

flub


v.

1924, American English, perhaps suggested by fluff, flop, etc. Related: Flubbed; flubbing. As a noun, by 1952.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper