fluted

[ floo-tid ]
/ ˈflu tɪd /

adjective

fine, clear, and mellow; flutelike: fluted notes.
having flutes, grooves, or the like: a fluted column; fluted material; fluted stone tools.

Origin of fluted

First recorded in 1605–15; flute + -ed3
Related formsun·flut·ed, adjective

Definition for fluted (2 of 2)

flute

[ floot ]
/ flut /

noun

verb (used without object), flut·ed, flut·ing.

verb (used with object), flut·ed, flut·ing.

to utter in flutelike tones.
to form longitudinal flutes or furrows in: to flute a piecrust.

Origin of flute

1350–1400; Middle English floute < Middle French flaüte, flahute, fleüte < Old Provençal flaüt (perhaps alteration of flaujol, flauja) < Vulgar Latin *flabeolum. See flageolet, lute1
Related formsflute·like, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fluted

British Dictionary definitions for fluted (1 of 2)

fluted

/ (ˈfluːtɪd) /

adjective

(esp of the shaft of a column) having flutes
sounding like a flute

British Dictionary definitions for fluted (2 of 2)

flute

/ (fluːt) /

noun

verb

to produce or utter (sounds) in the manner or tone of a flute
(tr) to make grooves or furrows in
Derived Formsflutelike, adjectivefluty, adjective

Word Origin for flute

C14: from Old French flahute, via Old Provençal, from Vulgar Latin flabeolum (unattested); perhaps also influenced by Old Provençal laut lute; see flageolet
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for fluted

flute


A high-pitched woodwind, held horizontally by the player and played by blowing across a hole.

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.