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forfeit

[ fawr-fit ]
/ ˈfɔr fɪt /
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See synonyms for: forfeit / forfeited / forfeiting on Thesaurus.com

noun
verb (used with object)
to subject to seizure as a forfeit.
to lose or become liable to lose, as in consequence of crime, fault, or breach of engagement.
adjective
lost or subject to loss by forfeiture.
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Origin of forfeit

First recorded in 1250–1300; Middle English forfet, from Old French (past participle of forfaire “to commit crime, to lose possession or right through a criminal act”), from Medieval Latin forīs factum “penalty,” past participle of forīs facere “to transgress,” equivalent to Latin forīs “outside, wrongly” + facere “to make, do”

OTHER WORDS FROM forfeit

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use forfeit in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for forfeit

forfeit
/ (ˈfɔːfɪt) /

noun
verb
(tr) to lose or be liable to lose in consequence of a mistake, fault, etc
(tr) law
  1. to confiscate as punishment
  2. to surrender (something exacted as a penalty)
adjective
surrendered or liable to be surrendered as a penalty

Derived forms of forfeit

forfeitable, adjectiveforfeiter, noun

Word Origin for forfeit

C13: from Old French forfet offence, from forfaire to commit a crime, from Medieval Latin foris facere to act outside (what is lawful), from Latin foris outside + facere to do
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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