forth

[ fawrth, fohrth ]
/ fɔrθ, foʊrθ /

adverb

onward or outward in place or space; forward: to come forth; go forth.
onward in time, in order, or in a series: from that day forth.
out, as from concealment or inaction; into view or consideration: The author's true point comes forth midway through the book.
away, as from a place or country: to journey forth.

preposition

Archaic. out of; forth from.

Nearby words

  1. fortas,
  2. fortas, abe,
  3. forte,
  4. forte-piano,
  5. fortepiano,
  6. forthcoming,
  7. forthright,
  8. forthwith,
  9. forties,
  10. fortieth

Origin of forth

before 900; Middle English, Old English; cognate with German fort; akin to further

Forth

[ fawrth, fohrth ]
/ fɔrθ, foʊrθ /

noun

Firth of, an arm of the North Sea, in SE Scotland: estuary of Forth River. 48 miles (77 km) long.
a river in S central Scotland, flowing E into the Firth of Forth. 116 miles (187 km) long.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for forth


British Dictionary definitions for forth

forth

/ (fɔːθ) /

adverb

forward in place, time, order, or degree
out, as from concealment, seclusion, or inaction
away, as from a place or country
and so on; et cetera

preposition

archaic out of; away from

Word Origin for forth

Old English; related to Middle High German vort; see for, further

Forth

/ (fɔːθ) /

noun

Firth of Forth an inlet of the North Sea in SE Scotland: spanned by a cantilever railway bridge 1600 m (almost exactly 1 mile) long (1889), and by a road bridge (1964)
a river in S Scotland, flowing generally east to the Firth of Forth. Length: about 104 km (65 miles)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for forth

forth

adv.

Old English forð "forward, onward, further, continually," perfective of fore, from Proto-Germanic *furtha- (cf. Old Frisian, Old Saxon forth "forward, onward," Old Norse forð, Dutch voort, German fort), from PIE *prto-, from *pr-, from root *per- (1) "forward, through" (see per).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with forth

forth

see and so forth; back and forth; bring forth; hold forth; put forth; set forth.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.