bean

[ been ]
/ bin /

noun

verb (used with object)

Slang. to hit on the head, especially with a baseball.

interjection

beans, (used to express disbelief, annoyance, etc.).

Idioms for bean

    full of beans, Informal.
    1. energetic; vigorously active; vital: He is still full of beans at 95.
    2. stupid; erroneous; misinformed.
    spill the beans, Informal. to disclose a secret, either accidentally or imprudently, thereby ruining a surprise or plan: He spilled the beans, and she knew all about the party in advance.

Origin of bean

before 950; Middle English bene, Old English bēan; cognate with Old Norse baun, Old Frisian bāne, Dutch boon, Old Saxon, Old High German bona (German Bohne), probably < Germanic *babnō, cognate with Russian bob, Latin faba < European Indo-European *bhabh-

OTHER WORDS FROM bean

bean·like, adjective

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH bean

bean been Ben bin
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for full of beans

bean
/ (biːn) /

noun

verb

mainly US and Canadian slang (tr) to hit (a person) on the head

Word Origin for bean

Old English bēan; related to Old Norse baun, Old Frisian bāne, Old High German bōna bean
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with full of beans (1 of 2)

full of beans

1

Lively, energetic, in high spirits, as in The children were full of beans today, looking forward to their field trip. This expression has no valid explanation. [c. 1840]

2

Also, full of prunes. Acting foolish, talking nonsense, as in One cup of coffee won't hurt you—you're full of prunes. [c. 1930] Also see full of crap.

Idioms and Phrases with full of beans (2 of 2)

bean

see full of beans; not have a bean; not know beans; not worth a dime (bean); spill the beans; tough break (beans).

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.