fusil

2
[ fyoo-zuh l, -sil ]
/ ˈfyu zəl, -sɪl /
|

adjective

formed by melting or casting; fused; founded.
Archaic. capable of being melted; fusible.
Archaic. melted; molten.
Also fu·sile [fyoo-zuh l, -sil, -sahyl] /ˈfyu zəl, -sɪl, -saɪl/.

Origin of fusil

2
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin fūsilis molten, fluid. See fuse2, -ile
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for fusile

  • Water, again, admits in the first place of a division into two kinds; the one liquid and the other fusile.

    Timaeus|Plato

British Dictionary definitions for fusile (1 of 3)

fusile

fusil

/ (ˈfjuːzaɪl) /

adjective

easily melted; fusible
formed by casting or melting; founded

Word Origin for fusile

C14: from Latin fūsilis molten, from fundere to pour out, melt

British Dictionary definitions for fusile (2 of 3)

fusil

1
/ (ˈfjuːzɪl) /

noun

a light flintlock musket

Word Origin for fusil

C16 (in the sense: steel for a tinderbox): from Old French fuisil, from Vulgar Latin focīlis (unattested), from Latin focus fire

British Dictionary definitions for fusile (3 of 3)

fusil

2
/ (ˈfjuːzɪl) /

noun

heraldry a charge shaped like a lengthened lozenge

Word Origin for fusil

C15: from Old French fusel, ultimately from Latin fūsus spindle, fuse 1 (the heraldic lozenge originally represented a spindle covered with tow for spinning)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for fusile

fusil


n.

flintlock musket, 1670s, from French fusil (see fusilier).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper