gecko

[gek-oh]
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noun, plural geck·os, geck·oes.

any of numerous small, mostly nocturnal tropical lizards of the family Gekkonidae, usually having toe pads that can cling to smooth surfaces: the largest species, Gekko gecko, is sometimes kept as a pet.

Origin of gecko

1705–15; < New Latin gekko < Dutch; origin uncertain; alleged to be a Malay word imitative of the lizard's call.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for gecko

Historical Examples of gecko

  • Little Billee, who adored all "sweet musicianers," jumped up and made Gecko as warmly welcome as he could in his early French.

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier

  • If Gecko hadn't been there, I don't know what we should have done.

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier

  • Why, he always laughed when I tried to sing; and so did Marta; and so did Gecko!

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier

  • Gecko with a knife, and people holding him, and Svengali bleeding on the ground.

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier

  • He played at three grand concerts with Gecko, and had a well-deserved success.

    Trilby

    George Du Maurier



British Dictionary definitions for gecko

gecko

noun plural -os or -oes

any small insectivorous terrestrial lizard of the family Gekkonidae, of warm regions. The digits have adhesive pads, which enable these animals to climb on smooth surfaces

Word Origin for gecko

C18: from Malay ge'kok, of imitative origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gecko
n.

1774, from Malay gekoq, said to be imitative of its cry. Earlier forms were chacco (1711), jackoa (1727).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper