Idioms

Origin of go

1
before 900; Middle English gon, Old English gān; cognate with Old High German gēn, German gehen

Definition for go whole hog (2 of 3)

hog

[ hawg, hog ]
/ hɔg, hɒg /

noun

verb (used with object), hogged, hog·ging.

verb (used without object), hogged, hog·ging.

Nautical. (of a hull) to have less than the proper amount of sheer because of structural weakness; arch.Compare sag(def 6a).

Origin of hog

1300–50; Middle English; compare Old English hogg- in place-names; perhaps < Celtic; compare Welsh hwch, Cornish hogh swine

Related forms

hog·like, adjectiveun·hogged, adjective

Definition for go whole hog (3 of 3)

whole hog


noun Informal.

the furthest extent; everything: With them it was whole hog or nothing.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for go whole hog (1 of 5)

GO

/ military /

abbreviation for

general order

British Dictionary definitions for go whole hog (2 of 5)

whole hog


noun

slang the whole or total extent (esp in the phrase go the whole hog)

British Dictionary definitions for go whole hog (3 of 5)

go

1
/ (ɡəʊ) /

verb goes, going, went or gone (mainly intr)

noun plural goes

adjective

(postpositive) informal functioning properly and ready for action: esp used in astronauticsall systems are go

Word Origin for go

Old English gān; related to Old High German gēn, Greek kikhanein to reach, Sanskrit jahāti he forsakes

British Dictionary definitions for go whole hog (4 of 5)

go

2

I-go

/ (ɡəʊ) /

noun

a game for two players in which stones are placed on a board marked with a grid, the object being to capture territory on the board

Word Origin for go

from Japanese

British Dictionary definitions for go whole hog (5 of 5)

hog

/ (hɒɡ) /

noun

verb hogs, hogging or hogged (tr)

Derived Forms

hogger, nounhoglike, adjective

Word Origin for hog

Old English hogg, from Celtic; compare Cornish hoch
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Culture definitions for go whole hog

go whole hog


To engage in something without reservation or constraint: “At first, the general had his doubts about the plan, but finally he decided to go whole hog.”

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with go whole hog (1 of 3)

go whole hog


Also, go the limit. Do something completely or thoroughly; proceed as far as possible. For example, Instead of just painting the room, why not go whole hog and redecorate it completely? or Let's go the limit and dig up the entire garden. Although the precise source of whole hog is disputed, this colloquialism was first recorded in 1828 (in Japhet by Frederick Marryat) as go the whole hog. Today the article is usually omitted. Go the limit, also a colloquialism, dates from the mid-1900s. Also see all out.

Idioms and Phrases with go whole hog (2 of 3)

hog


see go hog wild; go whole hog; high off the hog; road hog.

Idioms and Phrases with go whole hog (3 of 3)

whole hog


see go whole hog.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.