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gore

1
[ gawr, gohr ]
/ gɔr, goʊr /
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noun
blood that is shed, especially when clotted.
murder, bloodshed, violence, etc.: That horror movie had too much gore.
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Origin of gore

1
First recorded in before 900; Middle English gor(r)e “filth, moral filth,” Old English gor “dung, bull dung, dirt”; cognate with Dutch goor, Old High German gor “filth,” Old Norse gor “cud”

Other definitions for gore (2 of 5)

gore2
[ gawr, gohr ]
/ gɔr, goʊr /

verb (used with object), gored, gor·ing.
to pierce with or as if with a horn or tusk.

Origin of gore

2
First recorded in 1350–1400; Middle English gor(r)en “to pierce, stab,” derivative of gōre “spear, javelin, dart,” from Old English gār spear, shaft, arrow”; see also gore3

Other definitions for gore (3 of 5)

gore3
[ gawr, gohr ]
/ gɔr, goʊr /

noun
a triangular piece of material inserted in a garment, sail, etc., to give it greater width or a desired shape.Compare godet (def. 1), gusset (def. 1).
one of the panels, usually tapering or shaped, making up a garment, as a skirt.
a triangular tract of land, especially one lying between larger divisions.
verb (used with object), gored, gor·ing.
to make or furnish with a gore or gores.

Origin of gore

3
First recorded before 900; Middle English gor(e), gar(e) “triangular piece of land, triangular piece of cloth,” Old English gāra “triangular piece of land, corner” (cognate with German Gehre “gusset”); akin to Old English gār “spear”; see gore2

Other definitions for gore (4 of 5)

Gore1
[ gawr, gohr ]
/ gɔr, goʊr /

noun
Albert Arnold, Jr. "Al", born 1948, U.S. politician: vice president of the U.S. 1993–2001.

Other definitions for gore (5 of 5)

Gore2
[ gawr-ey, gohr-ey ]
/ ˈgɔr eɪ, ˈgoʊr eɪ /

noun
a city in W Ethiopia.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use gore in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for gore (1 of 4)

gore1
/ (ɡɔː) /

noun
blood shed from a wound, esp when coagulated
informal killing, fighting, etc

Word Origin for gore

Old English gor dirt; related to Old Norse gor half-digested food, Middle Low German göre, Dutch goor

British Dictionary definitions for gore (2 of 4)

gore2
/ (ɡɔː) /

verb
(tr) (of an animal, such as a bull) to pierce or stab (a person or another animal) with a horn or tusk

Word Origin for gore

C16: probably from Old English gār spear

British Dictionary definitions for gore (3 of 4)

gore3
/ (ɡɔː) /

noun
a tapering or triangular piece of material used in making a shaped skirt, umbrella, etc
a similarly shaped piece, esp of land
verb
(tr) to make into or with a gore or gores

Derived forms of gore

gored, adjective

Word Origin for gore

Old English gāra; related to Old Norse geiri gore, Old High German gēro

British Dictionary definitions for gore (4 of 4)

Gore
/ (ɡɔː) /

noun
Al (bert) Jr. born 1948, US Democrat politician; vice president of the US (1993–2001); defeated in the disputed presidential election of 2000; leading environmental campaigner; shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel For Climate Change
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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