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gymkhana

[jim-kah-nuh]
noun
  1. a field day held for equestrians, consisting of exhibitions of horsemanship and much pageantry.
  2. Also called autocross. a competition in which sports cars are timed as they travel on a closed, twisting course that requires much maneuvering.
  3. any of various other sporting events, as a gymnastics exhibition or surfing contest.
  4. a place where any such event is held.
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Origin of gymkhana

1860–65; < Hindi gē̃dkhānā literally, ball-house (influenced by gymnastics)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for gymkhana

Historical Examples of gymkhana

  • Directly after dinner we went in an open carriage to the ball at the Gymkhana.

    The Last Voyage

    Lady (Annie Allnutt) Brassey

  • The official people must all be at the Club and Gymkhana, or at Church.

  • The gymkhana represents the "compulsory games" of a public school.

    Appearances

    Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson

  • Take me out and show me the place and the shops and the Gymkhana—what do you call it here?

    The Jungle Girl

    Gordon Casserly

  • Or was the Gymkhana momentarily the stronger magnet of the two?

    Far to Seek

    Maud Diver


British Dictionary definitions for gymkhana

gymkhana

noun
  1. mainly British an event in which horses and riders display skill and aptitude in various races and contests
  2. (esp in Anglo-India) a place providing sporting and athletic facilities
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Word Origin for gymkhana

C19: from Hindi gend-khānā, literally: ball house, from khāna house; influenced by gymnasium
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for gymkhana

1861, Anglo-Indian, said to be from Hindustani gend-khana, literally "ball house;" altered in English by influence of gymnasium.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper