haste

[ heyst ]
/ heɪst /
||

noun

swiftness of motion; speed; celerity: He performed his task with great haste. They felt the need for haste.
urgent need of quick action; a hurry or rush: to be in haste to get ahead in the world.
unnecessarily quick action; thoughtless, rash, or undue speed: Haste makes waste.

verb (used with or without object), hast·ed, hast·ing.

Archaic. to hasten.

Idioms

    make haste, to act or go with speed; hurry: She made haste to tell the president the good news.

Origin of haste

1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Germanic; akin to Old Frisian hāste, Old English hæst violence, Old Norse heifst hatred, Gothic haifsts quarrel
SYNONYMS FOR haste
1 See speed.
2 flurry, bustle, ado, urgency.
3 precipitancy, precipitation.
ANTONYMS FOR haste
Related forms
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for hasteful

haste

/ (heɪst) /

noun

speed, esp in an action; swiftness; rapidity
the act of hurrying in a careless or rash manner
a necessity for hurrying; urgency
make haste to hurry; rush

verb

a poetic word for hasten
Derived Formshasteful, adjectivehastefully, adverb

Word Origin for haste

C14: from Old French haste, of Germanic origin; compare Old Norse heifst hate, Old English hǣst strife, Old High German heisti powerful
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with hasteful

haste


In addition to the idiom beginning with haste

  • haste makes waste

also see:

  • make haste
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.