heyday

1

or hey·dey

[ hey-dey ]
See synonyms for heyday on Thesaurus.com
noun
  1. the stage or period of greatest vigor, strength, success, etc.; prime: the heyday of the vaudeville stars.

  2. Archaic. high spirits.

Origin of heyday

1
1580–90; variant of high day, apparently by confusion with heyday2

Other definitions for heyday (2 of 2)

heyday2
[ hey-dey ]

interjectionArchaic.
  1. (used as an exclamation of cheerfulness, surprise, wonder, etc.)

Origin of heyday

2
1520–30; rhyming compound based on hey; replacing heyda<German hei da hey there

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use heyday in a sentence

  • In the heydey of gold mining, Lariat had been quite a flourishing place, but the hand of decay was upon it at the present time.

  • Those two happy winters in Columbus, when I was finding opportunity and recognition, were the heydey of life for me.

    Literature and Life | William Dean Howells
  • The overthrow of the empire surprised them in the heydey of their happiness.

    The Honor of the Name | Emile Gaboriau
  • If he moved without light he was likely to stumble, and heydey to his fifty crowns, not to say his liberty for many days to come.

    The Puppet Crown | Harold MacGrath
  • Their mother, who came of an impoverished line of princes—the H——s— had died at Petersburg when her husband was in his heydey.

    Fathers and Children | Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev

British Dictionary definitions for heyday

heyday

/ (ˈheɪˌdeɪ) /


noun
  1. the time of most power, popularity, vigour, etc; prime

Origin of heyday

1
C16: probably based on hey

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012