Hilary

[hil-uh-ree]
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noun

Also Hi·laire [hi-lair; French ee-ler] /hɪ lɛər; French iˈlɛr/. a male or female given name: from a Latin word meaning “cheerful.”

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for hilary

Contemporary Examples of hilary

Historical Examples of hilary

  • "'Twould be like hunting for a pin in a haystack," said the Rev. Hilary Jones.

  • He, Hilary Grendon, was the sole survivor of that tremendous Odyssey!

    Slaves of Mercury

    Nat Schachner

  • Hilary shook his head vigorously to clear away the flood of recollections.

    Slaves of Mercury

    Nat Schachner

  • Hilary Grendon was a methodical man: that was the reason he had survived.

    Slaves of Mercury

    Nat Schachner

  • Just like that, and lean back for the inevitable gasp: "What, not the Hilary Grendon!"

    Slaves of Mercury

    Nat Schachner


Word Origin and History for hilary

Hilary

masc. proper name, from Late Latin Hilarius, literally "cheerful," from Latin hilaris (see hilarity). The name was more popular in France than in England. The woman's name (Middle English Hillaria) seems to be merged with this from Eulalia, name of the patron saint of Barcelona, a Latinization of Greek eulalos "sweetly speaking." The Hilary sessions of British High Court and universities (1577) are from St. Hilarius, Bishop of Poitiers, obit. C.E. 368, whose feast day is Jan. 13.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper