stride

[ strahyd ]
/ straɪd /

verb (used without object), strode, strid·den [strid-n] /ˈstrɪd n/, strid·ing.

verb (used with object), strode, strid·den [strid-n] /ˈstrɪd n/, strid·ing.

noun

Idioms for stride

Origin of stride

before 900; (v.) Middle English striden, Old English strīdan; cognate with Dutch strijden, Low German strīden to stride; (noun) Middle English stride, derivative of the v.; akin to straddle

SYNONYMS FOR stride

OTHER WORDS FROM stride

strid·er, nounstrid·ing·ly, adverbout·stride, verb (used with object), out·strode, out·strid·den, out·strid·ing.
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

British Dictionary definitions for hit one's stride

stride
/ (straɪd) /

noun

verb strides, striding, strode or stridden

Derived forms of stride

strider, noun

Word Origin for stride

Old English strīdan; related to Old High German strītan to quarrel; see straddle
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Idioms and Phrases with hit one's stride (1 of 2)

hit one's stride

1

Achieve a steady, effective pace, as in After the first few laps around the track he hit his stride. This expression comes from horse racing, stride alluding to the regular pace of the horse. [Early 1900s]

2

Attain a maximum level of competence, as in Jack didn't really hit his stride until he started college. [First half of 1900s]

Idioms and Phrases with hit one's stride (2 of 2)

stride

see hit one's stride; make great strides; take in stride.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.