homogeneity

[ hoh-muh-juh-nee-i-tee, hom-uh- ]
/ ˌhoʊ mə dʒəˈni ɪ ti, ˌhɒm ə- /

noun

composition from like parts, elements, or characteristics; state or quality of being homogeneous.

QUIZZES

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Which of the following animal names traces its immediate origin to Portuguese?
Also ho·mo·ge·ne·ous·ness [hoh-muh-jee-nee-uhs-nis, -jeen-yuhs-, hom-uh-]. /ˌhoʊ məˈdʒi ni əs nɪs, -ˈdʒin yəs-, ˌhɒm ə-/.

Origin of homogeneity

1615–25; <Medieval Latin homogeneitās, equivalent to homogene(us) homogeneous + -itās-ity

OTHER WORDS FROM homogeneity

non·ho·mo·ge·ne·i·ty, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

VOCAB BUILDER

What does homogeneity mean?

Homogeneity is the state or quality of being homogeneous—consisting of parts or elements that are all the same.

Something described as homogeneous is uniform in nature or character throughout. Homogeneous can also be used to describe multiple things that are all essentially alike or of the same kind. It’s especially used to refer to the state of a society, culture, or situation that lacks variety or diversity. The word is often used in the context of criticism that implies that such things are biased, boring, or bland.

In the context of chemistry, homogeneous is used to describe a mixture that is uniform in structure or composition. Homogeneity can be used to refer to the state of such a mixture.

The general sense of homogeneous can be used interchangeably with the word homogenous (which is spelled without a second e and is pronounced differently). When used in this general way, homogenous is more commonly used than homogeneous. Homogeneity can be used in reference to either word.

The opposite of homogeneity is heterogeneity, which is the state of being heterogeneous—consisting of different, distinguishable parts or elements.

Example: The homogeneity of this suburb is extreme—even the houses all look the same.

Where does homogeneity come from?

The first records of the word homogeneity come from around the 1620s. It ultimately comes from the Greek homogenḗs, meaning “of the same kind,” from homo, “same,” and génos, “kind.” The suffix -ity is used to form nouns.

Homogeneity is a state in which everything is the same kind of thing. This can apply to objects, people, and abstract things like culture and society. It’s especially used to refer to the state of a group that lacks diversity—such as a board of directors that consists entirely of white men.

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What are some other forms of homogeneity?

  • nonhomogeneity (noun)

What are some synonyms for homogeneity?

What are some words that share a root or word element with homogeneity

What are some words that often get used in discussing homogeneity?

What are some words homogeneity may be commonly confused with?

How is homogeneity used in real life?

The word homogeneity is most commonly used in the context of something that lacks variety or diversity.

 

 

Try using homogeneity!

Which of the following words is NOT a synonym of homogeneity?

A. diversity
B. uniformity
C. homogeneousness
D. sameness

Example sentences from the Web for homogeneity

  • I feel like there’s a level of homogeneity, particularly at the most elite places, that makes me feel like we’re going to end up missing stories, missing important stories.

  • Homogeneity of material must be obtained, having regard to expansion and contraction.

    The Turkish Bath|Robert Owen Allsop
  • Homogeneity and like-mindedness are, as explanations of the social behavior of men and animals, very closely related concepts.

Cultural definitions for homogeneity

homogeneity
[ (hoh-muh-juh-nee-uh-tee, hoh-muh-juh-nay-uh-tee) ]

Cultural, social, biological, or other similarities within a group. (Compare heterogeneity.)

The New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.