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hunk

[huhngk]
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noun
  1. a large piece or lump; chunk.
  2. Slang.
    1. a handsome man with a well-developed physique.
    2. a large or fat person.
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Origin of hunk

First recorded in 1805–15, hunk is from the Dutch dialect word hunke

Synonyms for hunk

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Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for hunk

wedge, slice, morsel, lump, gob, slab, clod, loaf, nugget, glob, wad, batch, bulk, portion, mass, bunch, pile, bit, piece, block

Examples from the Web for hunk

Contemporary Examples of hunk

Historical Examples of hunk

  • Just as I said, it was all hunk till I struck the rocks, and I've been up in the air ever since.

    Pathfinder

    Alan Douglas

  • A hunk of solid, non-magnetic metal about the size of an office desk.

    Spacehounds of IPC

    Edward Elmer Smith

  • I have been playing encyclopedia for that hunk of animated machinery for an hour.

    Unwise Child

    Gordon Randall Garrett

  • But Hunk was one of the old crowd that didn't need much dodgin'.

  • That is, it seemed like business to him; for, in his special way, Hunk had been comin' along.


British Dictionary definitions for hunk

hunk

noun
  1. a large piece
  2. Also called: hunk of a man slang a well-built, sexually attractive man
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Word Origin for hunk

C19: probably related to Flemish hunke; compare Dutch homp lump
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for hunk

n.

1813, "large piece cut off," possibly from West Flemish hunke (used of bread and meat), which is perhaps related to Dutch homp "lump, hump." Meaning "attractive, sexually appealing man" is first attested 1945 in jive talk (in Australian slang, it is recorded from 1941).

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper