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IC

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plural ICs. immediate constituent.
Electronics. integrated circuit.
intensive care.
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Other definitions for IC (2 of 3)

-ic

a suffix forming adjectives from other parts of speech, occurring originally in Greek and Latin loanwords (metallic; poetic; archaic; public) and, on this model, used as an adjective-forming suffix with the particular senses “having some characteristics of” (opposed to the simple attributive use of the base noun) (balletic; sophomoric); “in the style of” (Byronic; Miltonic); “pertaining to a family of peoples or languages” (Finnic; Semitic; Turkic).
Chemistry. a suffix, specialized in opposition to -ous, used to show the higher of two valences: ferric chloride.
a noun suffix occurring chiefly in loanwords from Greek, where such words were originally adjectival (critic; magic; music).

Origin of -ic

Middle English -ic, -ik, from Latin -icus; in many words representing the cognate Greek -ikos (directly or through Latin ); in some words replacing -ique, from French, from Latin -icus

Other definitions for IC (3 of 3)

I.C.

abbreviation
Jesus Christ.

Origin of I.C.

<Latin I(ēsus) C(hrīstus)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use IC in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for IC (1 of 3)

IC

abbreviation for
internal-combustion
electronics integrated circuit
text messaging I see
(in transformational grammar) immediate constituent
astrology Imum Coeli: the point on the ecliptic lying directly opposite the Midheaven

British Dictionary definitions for IC (2 of 3)

-ic

suffix forming adjectives
of, relating to, or resemblingallergic; Germanic; periodic See also -ical
(in chemistry) indicating that an element is chemically combined in the higher of two possible valence statesferric; stannic Compare -ous (def. 2)

Word Origin for -ic

from Latin -icus or Greek -ikos; -ic also occurs in nouns that represent a substantive use of adjectives (magic) and in nouns borrowed directly from Latin or Greek (critic, music)

British Dictionary definitions for IC (3 of 3)

i/c

abbreviation for
in charge (of)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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