imperial

1
[ im-peer-ee-uhl ]
/ ɪmˈpɪər i əl /

adjective

noun


Nearby words

  1. imperfective,
  2. imperforate,
  3. imperforate anus,
  4. imperforation,
  5. imperia,
  6. imperial beach,
  7. imperial bushel,
  8. imperial eagle,
  9. imperial gallon,
  10. imperial jade

Origin of imperial

1
1325–75; Middle English < Late Latin imperiālis, equivalent to Latin imperi(um) imperium + -ālis -al1; replacing Middle English emperial < Middle French < Late Latin, as above

Related formsim·pe·ri·al·ly, adverbim·pe·ri·al·ness, noun

Can be confusedimperative imperial imperious

imperial

2
[ im-peer-ee-uh l ]
/ ɪmˈpɪər i əl /

noun

a small, pointed beard beneath the lower lip.

Origin of imperial

2
1835–45; < French impériale, noun use of feminine of impérial imperial1

imperial

3
[ im-peer-ee-uh l ]
/ ɪmˈpɪər i əl /

noun

a Russian gold coin originally worth 10 rubles and from 1897 to 1917 worth 15 rubles.

Origin of imperial

3
1830–40; < Russian imperiálMedieval Latin imperiālis a coin, noun use of Late Latin imperiālis imperial1

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for imperial


British Dictionary definitions for imperial

imperial

/ (ɪmˈpɪərɪəl) /

adjective

noun

Derived Formsimperially, adverbimperialness, noun

Word Origin for imperial

C14: from Late Latin imperiālis, from Latin imperium command, authority, empire

Imperial

/ (ɪmˈpɪərɪəl) /

adjective

(sometimes not capital) of or relating to a specified empire, such as the British Empire

noun

a supporter or soldier of the Holy Roman Empire
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for imperial

imperial

adj.

late 14c., "having a commanding quality," from Old French imperial (12c.), from Latin imperialis "of the empire or emperor," from imperium (see empire). Meaning "pertaining to an empire" (especially the Roman) is from late 14c. Imperial presidency in a U.S. context traces to Arthur Schlesinger Jr.'s book on the Nixon administration (1974). Related: Imperially.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper