infill

or in-fill

[ in-fil ]
/ ˈɪnˌfɪl /

verb (used with object)

to fill in: The old stream beds have been infilled with sediment.

noun

the planned conversion of empty lots, underused or rundown buildings, and other available space in densely built-up urban and suburban areas for use as sites for commercial buildings and housing, frequently as an alternative to overdevelopment of rural areas.

adjective

of, relating to, or involving the use of infill in urban planning: infill condominium projects; infill office buildings and retail space.

QUIZZES

WHO SAID IT: A QUIZ ON PRESIDENTIAL WIT AND WISDOM

Think you know your presidents? Take this quiz and see if you can match the style, wit, and ideology of these memorable lines to the right POTUS.
Question 1 of 9
“I do believe that the buck stops here, that I cannot rely upon public opinion polls to tell me what is right. I do believe that right makes might and that if I am wrong, 10 angels swearing I was right would make no difference.”

Origin of infill

First recorded in 1875–80; in-1 + fill
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

British Dictionary definitions for infill

infill

infilling (ˈɪnfɪlɪŋ)

/ (ˈɪnfɪl) /

noun

the act of filling or closing gaps, etc, in something, such as a row of buildings
material used to fill a cavity, gap, hole, etc
an acrylic gel application that fills in the gap between a false nail and the root of the real nail, which is created as the real nail grows
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012