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ingrain

[ verb in-greyn; adjective, noun in-greyn ]
/ verb ɪnˈgreɪn; adjective, noun ˈɪnˌgreɪn /
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See synonyms for: ingrain / ingrained on Thesaurus.com

verb (used with object)
to implant or fix deeply and firmly, as in the nature or mind.
adjective
noun
yarn, wool, etc., dyed before manufacture.
an ingrain carpet.
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Also en·grain [en-greyn] /ɛnˈgreɪn/ (for defs. 1, 2) .

Origin of ingrain

First recorded in 1760–70; originally phrase (dyed) in grain (i.e., with kermes)
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2022

How to use ingrain in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for ingrain

ingrain

engrain


verb (ɪnˈɡreɪn) (tr)
to impress deeply on the mind or nature; instil
archaic to dye into the fibre of (a fabric)
adjective (ˈɪnˌɡreɪn)
variants of ingrained
(of woven or knitted articles, esp rugs and carpets) made of dyed yarn or of fibre that is dyed before being spun into yarn
noun (ˈɪnˌɡreɪn)
  1. a carpet made from ingrained yarn
  2. such yarn

Word Origin for ingrain

C18: from the phrase dyed in grain dyed with kermes through the fibre
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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