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inaudible

[in-aw-duh-buh l]
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adjective
  1. not audible; incapable of being heard.
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Origin of inaudible

First recorded in 1595–1605; in-3 + audible
Related formsin·au·di·bil·i·ty, in·au·di·ble·ness, nounin·au·di·bly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for inaudible

imperceptible, muffled, closemouthed, faint, low, mum, mute, noiseless, quiet, soundless, still, unclear, uncommunicative, voiceless, muted, nonvocal, wordless

Examples from the Web for inaudible

Contemporary Examples of inaudible

Historical Examples of inaudible

  • Kirkwood settled himself with an inaudible sigh of pleasure.

    The Black Bag

    Louis Joseph Vance

  • He managed to make it inaudible, however; and it was as well that he did.

  • Under cover of the music her voice was inaudible to any one else.

    The Avenger

    E. Phillips Oppenheim

  • The other voice was lower in key and the words were inaudible.

    Keziah Coffin

    Joseph C. Lincoln

  • The cabman got on to his box, muttering something that was inaudible.

    A Son of Hagar

    Sir Hall Caine


British Dictionary definitions for inaudible

inaudible

adjective
  1. not loud enough to be heard; not audible
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Derived Formsinaudibility or inaudibleness, nouninaudibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for inaudible

adj.

mid-15c., "unfit to be heard;" c.1600, "unable to be heard," from Latin inaudibilis "inaudible," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + audibilis (see audible). Related: Inaudibly; inaudibility.

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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper