indwell

[ in-dwel ]
/ ɪnˈdwɛl /

verb (used with object), in·dwelt, in·dwell·ing.

to inhabit.
to possess (a person), as a moral principle or motivating force: compassion that indwells the heart.

verb (used without object), in·dwelt, in·dwell·ing.

to dwell (usually followed by in).
to abide within, as a guiding force, motivating principle, etc. (usually followed by in): a divine spirit indwelling in nature and the universe.

Origin of indwell

First recorded in 1350–1400, indwell is from the Middle English word indwellen. See in-1, dwell
Related formsin·dwell·er, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for indwelling

British Dictionary definitions for indwelling

indwell

/ (ɪnˈdwɛl) /

verb -dwells, -dwelling or -dwelt

(tr) (of a spirit, principle, etc) to inhabit; suffuse
(intr) to dwell; exist
Derived Formsindweller, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for indwelling

indwelling


n.

"act of residing," late 14c. (Wyclif's translation of Latin inhabitatio), present participle of obsolete indwell, from in (adv.) + dwell (v.). He also used indweller for Latin inhabitans.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper