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infuriate

[ verb in-fyoor-ee-eyt; adjective in-fyoor-ee-it ]
/ verb ɪnˈfyʊər iˌeɪt; adjective ɪnˈfyʊər i ɪt /
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SEE MORE SYNONYMS FOR infuriate ON THESAURUS.COM

verb (used with object), in·fu·ri·at·ed, in·fu·ri·at·ing.

to make furious; enrage.

adjective

Archaic. infuriated.

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RELATED WORDS

enraged, incensed, angered, angry, mad

Nearby words

infundibuliform, infundibulofolliculitis, infundibuloma, infundibulum, infundibulum of uterine tube, infuriate, infuriating, infuscate, infuse, infuser, infusible

Origin of infuriate

1660–70; < Medieval Latin infuriātus past participle of infuriāre to madden, enrage. See in-2, fury, -ate1
SYNONYMS FOR infuriate
1 anger. See enrage.
Related formsin·fu·ri·ate·ly, adverbin·fu·ri·a·tion, nounun·in·fu·ri·at·ed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for infuriated

British Dictionary definitions for infuriated

infuriate


verb (ɪnˈfjʊərɪˌeɪt)

(tr) to anger; annoy

adjective (ɪnˈfjʊərɪɪt)

archaic furious; infuriated
Derived Formsinfuriately, adverbinfuriating, adjectiveinfuriatingly, adverbinfuriation, noun

Word Origin for infuriate

C17: from Medieval Latin infuriāre (vb); see in- ², fury
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for infuriated

infuriate


v.

1660s, from Italian infuriato, from Medieval Latin infuriatus, past participle of infuriare "to madden," from Latin in furia "in a fury," from ablative of furia (see fury). Related: Infuriated; infuriating; infuriatingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper