insincere

[in-sin-seer]

Origin of insincere

1625–35; < Latin insincērus tainted, dishonest; see in-3, sincere
Related formsin·sin·cere·ly, adverb

Synonyms for insincere

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Examples from the Web for insincerely

Contemporary Examples of insincerely

Historical Examples of insincerely

  • “But after night it is so very dark on the trail to camp,” he insincerely objected.

  • "You—you'll have to have patience," Henley remarked, insincerely.

    Dixie Hart

    Will N. Harben

  • "Well, but she couldn't know all about me," said George insincerely.

    The Roll-Call

    Arnold Bennett

  • "Fortunately it doesn't matter, as Julian is late too," said Mrs. Maldon insincerely, for it was mattering very much.

    The Price of Love

    Arnold Bennett

  • Still less, that she would be made happy by his insincerely pretending to be of the same religion.

    On Compromise

    John Morley


British Dictionary definitions for insincerely

insincere

adjective
  1. lacking sincerity; hypocritical
Derived Formsinsincerely, adverbinsincerity (ˌɪnsɪnˈsɛrɪtɪ), noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for insincerely

insincere

adj.

1620s (implied in insincerely), from Latin insincerus "not genuine, not pure, adulterated," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + sincerus (see sincere).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper