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is

[iz]
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verb
  1. 3rd person singular present indicative of be.
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Idioms
  1. as is. as1(def 23).
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Origin of is

before 900; Middle English, Old English; cognate with Dutch is, Old Norse es, er, German, Gothic ist, Latin est, Greek estí, OCS jestĭ, Sanskrit asti

IS

  1. Islamic State. See ISIS.
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I, i

[ahy]
noun, plural I's or Is, i's or is.
  1. the ninth letter of the English alphabet, a vowel.
  2. any spoken sound represented by the letter I or i, as in big, nice, or ski.
  3. something having the shape of an I.
  4. a written or printed representation of the letter I or i.
  5. a device, as a printer's type, for reproducing the letter I ori.
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be

[bee; unstressed bee, bi]
verb (used without object), present singular 1st person am, 2nd are or (Archaic) art, 3rd is, present plural are; past singular 1st person was, 2nd were or (Archaic) wast or wert, 3rd was, past plural were; present subjunctive be; past subjunctive singular 1st person were, 2nd were or (Archaic) wert, 3rd were; past subjunctive plural were; past participle been; present participle be·ing.
  1. to exist or live: Shakespeare's “To be or not to be” is the ultimate question.
  2. to take place; happen; occur: The wedding was last week.
  3. to occupy a place or position: The book is on the table.
  4. to continue or remain as before: Let things be.
  5. to belong; attend; befall: May good fortune be with you.
  6. (used as a copula to connect the subject with its predicate adjective, or predicate nominative, in order to describe, identify, or amplify the subject): Martha is tall. John is president. This is she.
  7. (used as a copula to introduce or form interrogative or imperative sentences): Is that right? Be quiet! Don't be facetious.
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auxiliary verb, present singular 1st person am, 2nd are or (Archaic) art, 3rd is, present plural are; past singular 1st person was, 2nd were or (Archaic) wast or wert, 3rd was, past plural were; present subjunctive be; past subjunctive singular 1st person were, 2nd were or (Archaic) wert, 3rd were; past subjunctive plural were; past participle been; present participle be·ing.
  1. (used with the present participle of another verb to form the progressive tense): I am waiting.
  2. (used with the present participle or infinitive of the principal verb to indicate future action): She is visiting there next week. He is to see me today.
  3. (used with the past participle of another verb to form the passive voice): The date was fixed. It must be done.
  4. (used in archaic or literary constructions with some intransitive verbs to form the perfect tense): He is come. Agamemnon to the wars is gone.
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Origin of be

before 900; Middle English been, Old English bēon (bēo- (akin to Old Frisian, Old High German bim, German bin, Old Saxon bium, biom (I) am, Old English, Old High German, Old Saxon būan, Old Norse būa reside, Latin fuī (I) have been, Greek phy- grow, become, Old Irish boí (he) was, Sanskrit bhávati (he) becomes, is, Lithuanian búti to be, OCS byti, Persian būd was)) + -n infinitive suffix. See am, is, are1, was, were
Can be confusedbe bee

Usage note

See me.

I

[ahy]
pronoun, nominative I, possessive my or mine, objective me; plural nominative we, possessive our or ours, objective us.
  1. the nominative singular pronoun, used by a speaker in referring to himself or herself.
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noun, plural I's.
  1. (used to denote the narrator of a literary work written in the first person singular).
  2. Metaphysics. the ego.
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Origin of I

before 900; Middle English ik, ich, i; Old English ic, ih; cognate with German ich, Old Norse ek, Latin ego, Greek egṓ, OCS azŭ, Lithuanian aš, Sanskrit ahám
Can be confusedaye eye I

Usage note

See me.

is-

  1. variant of iso- before a vowel: isallobar.
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is.

  1. island.
  2. isle.
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Is.

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2018

Related Words for is

breathe, do, last, prevail, move, remain, rest, stay, persist, live, continue, subsist, stand, act, survive, inhabit, hold, obtain, abide, endure

British Dictionary definitions for is

is

1
verb
  1. (used with he, she, it, and with singular nouns) a form of the present tense (indicative mood) of be 1
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Word Origin for is

Old English; compare Old Norse es, German ist, Latin est, Greek esti

is

2
the internet domain name for
  1. Iceland
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IS

abbreviation for
  1. Iceland (international car registration)
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Word Origin for IS

Icelandic ĺsland

Be

the chemical symbol for
  1. beryllium
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BE

abbreviation for
  1. bill of exchange
  2. (in the US) Board of Education
  3. Bachelor of Education
  4. Bachelor of Engineering
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abbreviation for
  1. Baumé
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i

I

noun plural i's, I's or Is
  1. the ninth letter and third vowel of the modern English alphabet
  2. any of several speech sounds represented by this letter, in English as in bite or hit
    1. something shaped like an I
    2. (in combination)an I-beam
  3. dot the i's and cross the t's to pay meticulous attention to detail
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i

symbol for
  1. the imaginary number √–1Also called: j
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is-

combining form
  1. variant of iso- isentropic
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Is.

abbreviation for
  1. Also: Isa Bible Isaiah
  2. Island(s) or Isle(s)
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be

1
verb present singular 1st person am; 2nd person are; 3rd person is; present plural are; past singular 1st person was; 2nd person were; 3rd person was; past plural were; present participle being or past participle been (intr)
  1. to have presence in the realm of perceived reality; exist; liveI think, therefore I am; not all that is can be understood
  2. (used in the perfect or past perfect tenses only) to pay a visit; gohave you been to Spain?
  3. to take place; occurmy birthday was last Thursday
  4. (copula) used as a linking verb between the subject of a sentence and its noun or adjective complement or complementing phrase. In this case be expresses the relationship of either essential or incidental equivalence or identity (John is a man; John is a musician) or specifies an essential or incidental attribute (honey is sweet; Susan is angry). It is also used with an adverbial complement to indicate a relationship of location in space or time (Bill is at the office; the dance is on Saturday)
  5. (takes a present participle) forms the progressive present tensethe man is running
  6. (takes a past participle) forms the passive voice of all transitive verbs and (archaically) certain intransitive onesa good film is being shown on television tonight; I am done
  7. (takes an infinitive) expresses intention, expectation, supposition, or obligationthe president is to arrive at 9.30; you are not to leave before I say so
  8. (takes a past participle) forms the perfect or past perfect tense of certain intransitive verbs of motion, such as go or comethe last train is gone
  9. be that as it may the facts concerning (something) are of no importance
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Word Origin for be

Old English bēon; related to Old High German bim am, Latin fui I have been, Greek phuein to bring forth, Sanskrit bhavati he is

be

2
the internet domain name for
  1. Belgium
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I

1
pronoun
  1. (subjective) refers to the speaker or writer
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Word Origin for I

C12: reduced form of Old English ic; compare Old Saxon ik, Old High German ih, Sanskrit ahám

I

2
symbol for
  1. chem iodine
  2. physics current
  3. physics isospin
  4. logic a particular affirmative categorial statement, such as some men are married, often symbolized as SiPCompare A, E, O 1
  5. (Roman numeral) oneSee Roman numerals
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abbreviation for
  1. Italy (international car registration)
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Word Origin for I

(for sense 4) from Latin (aff) i (rmo) I affirm
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for is

v.

third person singular present of be, Old English is, from Germanic stem *es- (cf. Old High German, German, Gothic ist, Old Norse es, er), from PIE *es-ti- (cf. Sanskrit asti, Greek esti, Latin est, Lithuanian esti, Old Church Slavonic jesti), from PIE root *es- "to be." Old English lost the final -t-. See be. Until 1500s, pronounced to rhyme with kiss.

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I

pron.

12c. shortening of Old English ic, first person singular nominative pronoun, from Proto-Germanic *ekan (cf. Old Frisian ik, Old Norse ek, Norwegian eg, Danish jeg, Old High German ih, German ich, Gothic ik), from PIE *eg-, nominative form of the first person singular pronoun (cf. Sanskrit aham, Hittite uk, Latin ego (source of French Je), Greek ego, Russian ja, Lithuanian ). Reduced to i by mid-12c. in northern England, it began to be capitalized mid-13c. to mark it as a distinct word and avoid misreading in handwritten manuscripts.

The reason for writing I is ... the orthographic habit in the middle ages of using a 'long i' (that is, j or I) whenever the letter was isolated or formed the last letter of a group; the numeral 'one' was written j or I (and three iij, etc.), just as much as the pronoun. [Otto Jespersen, "Growth and Structure of the English Language," p.233]

The form ich or ik, especially before vowels, lingered in northern England until c.1400 and survived in southern dialects until 18c. The dot on the "small" letter -i- began to appear in 11c. Latin manuscripts, to distinguish the letter from the stroke of another letter (such as -m- or -n-). Originally a diacritic, it was reduced to a dot with the introduction of Roman type fonts.

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be

v.

Old English beon, beom, bion "be, exist, come to be, become, happen," from Proto-Germanic *biju- "I am, I will be." This "b-root" is from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow, come into being," and in addition to the words in English it yielded German present first and second person singular (bin, bist, from Old High German bim "I am," bist "thou art"), Latin perfective tenses of esse (fui "I was," etc.), Old Church Slavonic byti "be," Greek phu- "become," Old Irish bi'u "I am," Lithuanian bu'ti "to be," Russian byt' "to be," etc. It also is behind Sanskrit bhavah "becoming," bhavati "becomes, happens," bhumih "earth, world."

The modern verb to be in its entirety represents the merger of two once-distinct verbs, the "b-root" represented by be and the am/was verb, which was itself a conglomerate. Roger Lass ("Old English") describes the verb as "a collection of semantically related paradigm fragments," while Weekley calls it "an accidental conglomeration from the different Old English dial[ect]s." It is the most irregular verb in Modern English and the most common. Collective in all Germanic languages, it has eight different forms in Modern English:

BE (infinitive, subjunctive, imperative)
AM (present 1st person singular)
ARE (present 2nd person singular and all plural)
IS (present 3rd person singular)
WAS (past 1st and 3rd persons singular)
WERE (past 2nd person singular, all plural; subjunctive)
BEING (progressive & present participle; gerund)
BEEN (perfect participle).

The paradigm in Old English was:

SING.PL.
1st pres.ic eom
ic beo
we sind(on)
we beoð
2nd pres.þu eart
þu bist
ge sind(on)
ge beoð
3rd pres.he is
he bið
hie sind(on)
hie beoð
1st pret.ic wæswe wæron
2nd pret.þu wærege waeron
3rd pret.heo wæshie wæron
1st pret. subj.ic wærewe wæren
2nd pret. subj.þu wærege wæren
3rd pret. subj.Egcferð wærehie wæren

The "b-root" had no past tense in Old English, but often served as future tense of am/was. In 13c. it took the place of the infinitive, participle and imperative forms of am/was. Later its plural forms (we beth, ye ben, they be) became standard in Middle English and it made inroads into the singular (I be, thou beest, he beth), but forms of are claimed this turf in the 1500s and replaced be in the plural. For the origin and evolution of the am/was branches of this tangle, see am and was.

That but this blow Might be the be all, and the end all. ["Macbeth" I.vii.5]
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Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

is in Medicine

I

  1. The symbol for the elementiodine
  2. i The symbol forcurrent
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is-

pref.
  1. Variant ofiso-
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Be

  1. The symbol for the elementberyllium
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The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

is in Science

i

[ī]
  1. The number whose square is equal to -1. Numbers expressed in terms of i are called imaginary or complex numbers.
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I

  1. The symbol for electric current.
  2. The symbol for iodine.
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Be

  1. The symbol for beryllium.
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The American Heritage® Science Dictionary Copyright © 2011. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Idioms and Phrases with is

be

In addition to the idioms beginning with be

  • be a credit to
  • be along
  • be big on
  • be bound to
  • be busted
  • bed and board
  • bed and breakfast
  • bed of roses
  • be down
  • bee in one's bonnet
  • been around
  • been had
  • been there, done that
  • been to the wars
  • beginning of the end, the
  • begin to see daylight
  • begin to see the light
  • begin with
  • beg off
  • beg the question
  • beg to differ
  • be had
  • be in on
  • be into
  • bell the cat, who will
  • be my guest
  • bend one's elbow
  • bend over backwards
  • bend someone's ear
  • be off
  • be on
  • be oneself
  • be on to
  • beside oneself
  • beside the point
  • be that as it may
  • be the death of
  • be the end of one
  • be the making of

also see:

  • let be
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i

see dot the i's and cross the t's.

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The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.