jaybird

[jey-burd]
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noun


Origin of jaybird

An Americanism dating back to 1655–65; jay1 + bird
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for jaybird

Historical Examples of jaybird

  • As an example of many may be mentioned the little Rhyme "Jaybird."

    Negro Folk Rhymes

    Thomas W. Talley

  • Growed too, and dressed to kill, and sittin' in this yer house as natril as a jaybird!

  • Having finished this to his liking, he turned before they made the second trip on the Jaybird and her cargo.

  • He swung the Jaybird up on his broad shoulders, and started off up a trail none too good at best.

  • In "Jaybird," the first two lines of each stanza are a call in thought, while the last two lines are a "sponse" in thought to it.

    Negro Folk Rhymes

    Thomas W. Talley


Word Origin and History for jaybird
n.

1660s, from jay + bird (n.). It appears after the time jay began to be used of persons, too.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with jaybird

jaybird

see naked as a jaybird.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.