jingle

[ jing-guhl ]
/ ˈdʒɪŋ gəl /

verb (used without object), jin·gled, jin·gling.

verb (used with object), jin·gled, jin·gling.

to cause to jingle: He jingled the coins in his pocket.

noun

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Origin of jingle

1350–1400; Middle English gynglen, apparently imitative; compare Dutch jengelen;see -le

OTHER WORDS FROM jingle

jingler, nounjin·gling·ly, adverbjingly, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2020

Example sentences from the Web for jingle

British Dictionary definitions for jingle

jingle
/ (ˈdʒɪŋɡəl) /

verb

to ring or cause to ring lightly and repeatedly
(intr) to sound in a manner suggestive of jinglinga jingling verse

noun

a sound of metal jinglingthe jingle of the keys
a catchy and rhythmic verse, song, etc, esp one used in advertising

Derived forms of jingle

jingler, nounjingly, adjective

Word Origin for jingle

C16: probably of imitative origin; compare Dutch jengelen
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012