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journal

[ jur-nl ]
/ ˈdʒɜr nl /
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noun
verb (used without object)
to write self-examining or reflective journal entries, especially in school or as part of psychotherapy: Students should journal as part of a portfolio assessment program.
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Origin of journal

First recorded in 1325–75; Middle English, from Old French journal “daily,” from Late Latin diurnālis; see diurnal

OTHER WORDS FROM journal

jour·nal·ar·y, adjectivejour·nal·ish, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2023

How to use journal in a sentence

British Dictionary definitions for journal

journal
/ (ˈdʒɜːnəl) /

noun
a newspaper or periodical
a book in which a daily record of happenings, etc, is kept
an official record of the proceedings of a legislative body
accounting
  1. Also called: Book of Original Entry one of several books in which transactions are initially recorded to facilitate subsequent entry in the ledger
  2. another name for daybook
the part of a shaft or axle in contact with or enclosed by a bearing
a plain cylindrical bearing to support a shaft or axle

Word Origin for journal

C14: from Old French: daily, from Latin diurnālis; see diurnal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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