knockoff

or knock-off

[ nok-awf, -of ]
/ ˈnɒkˌɔf, -ˌɒf /

noun

an act or instance of knocking off.
an unlicensed copy of something, especially fashion clothing, intended to be sold at a lower price than the original.

Nearby words

  1. knock down,
  2. knock down with a feather,
  3. knock for a loop,
  4. knock into a cocked hat,
  5. knock it off,
  6. knock on wood,
  7. knock oneself out,
  8. knock out,
  9. knock over,
  10. knock over with a feather

Origin of knockoff

First recorded in 1870–75, for an earlier sense; noun use of verb phrase knock off

Origin of knock

before 1000; 1890–95 for def 4; Middle English knokken, knoken (v.), Old English cnocian, cnucian; cognate with Old Norse knoka to thump, knock

Related formsknock·less, adjectivere·knock, verbun·knocked, adjectiveun·knock·ing, adjective

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019


British Dictionary definitions for knock off

knock off

verb (mainly adverb)

noun knockoff

informal
  1. an illegal imitation of a well-known product
  2. (as modifier)knockoff watches

knock

/ (nɒk) /

verb

noun


Word Origin for knock

Old English cnocian, of imitative origin; related to Old Norse knoka to hit

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Word Origin and History for knock off
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper

Idioms and Phrases with knock off

knock off

1

Take a break or rest from, stop, especially quit working. For example, He knocked off work at noon, or Let's knock off at five o'clock. [Colloquial; mid-1600s] Also see knock it off.

2

Also, knock out. Dispose of or produce easily or hastily, finish, as in A writer of detective novels, he knocks off a book a year, or We can knock out a rough drawing in a few minutes. The first colloquial usage dates from the early 1800s, the variant from the mid-1800s.

3

Get rid of, reduce, as in She knocked off twelve pounds in a month, or They knocked off one-third of the original price. [Colloquial; early 1800s]

4

Kill, murder, as in They decided to knock off the old lady. [Slang; early 1900s] Also see knock someone's block off.

5

Copy or imitate, especially without permission, as in They are knocking off designer Swiss watches and selling them for a few dollars. [Colloquial; late 1800s]

6

Hold up, rob, as in The gang knocked off two liquor stores in half an hour. [Slang; early 1900s] Also see knock the socks off.

knock

In addition to the idioms beginning with knock

  • knock about
  • knock back
  • knock cold
  • knock dead
  • knock down
  • knock down with a feather
  • knock for a loop
  • knock into a cocked hat
  • knock it off
  • knock off
  • knock oneself out
  • knock on wood
  • knock out
  • knock over
  • knock over with a feather
  • knock someone's block off
  • knock someone's socks off
  • knock the bottom out of
  • knock the living daylights out of
  • knock the socks off
  • knock together
  • knock up

also see:

  • beat (knock) into someone's head
  • beat (knock) the living daylights out of
  • (knock) down to size
  • (knock) off someone's feet
  • school of hard knocks
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.