lackaday

[lak-uh-dey]
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interjection Archaic.

(used as an expression of regret, sorrow, dismay, or disapproval.)

Origin of lackaday

First recorded in 1685–95; alteration of alack the day
Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2019

Examples from the Web for lackaday

Historical Examples of lackaday

  • Lackaday, did you suppose I came to bring you news of your own wedding?

  • I'm going next door to the Lackaday, for the night, Bosworth.

    The Alternative

    George Barr McCutcheon

  • "You never know what a fool can do till you try him," said Lackaday.

    The Mountebank

    William J. Locke

  • Then, before the bewildered Lackaday could reply, she tossed his hand to the winds.

    The Mountebank

    William J. Locke

  • An expression of shock overspread Lackaday's ingenuous features.

    The Mountebank

    William J. Locke


British Dictionary definitions for lackaday

lackaday

interjection

archaic another word for alas

Word Origin for lackaday

C17: from alack the day
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012